☥ Meow ☥
23 July 2014 ♥ 142 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from farrahfuckingflawless    source: childofsodom
mulhukh:

THEY’RE EATING YOUR CHIPS AND TEACHING YOUR CHILDREN TO BE MORE ACCEPTING

mulhukh:

THEY’RE EATING YOUR CHIPS AND TEACHING YOUR CHILDREN TO BE MORE ACCEPTING

zooxanthele:

setbabiesonfire:

wild-guy:

Achrioptera fallax (x)

Yoooo

IT. IS. PRECIOUS ;A;!!!

23 July 2014 ♥ 57,064 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from thegreenwolf    source: wild-guy

graveyard-whimsy:

You know how some people think that goths live super ultra spooky at all times, but in reality we’re pretty much basic as hell? Because I was thinking that I would honestly love to live “perceived goth lifestyle” and live in a huge mansion next to a graveyard and sleep in a coffin and be decked out head to toe in velvet frills and fishnets at all hours of the day and work the night shift and have a pet bat named Dmitrius and yeah man sign me up

22 July 2014 ♥ 197 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from vulcanprincessx    source: graveyard-whimsy
mostlycatsmostly:

theparadoxmachine:

alanahikarichan:

hideousblob:

mostlycatsmostly:

Raising Kittens
(via Valerija S. Vlasov)

dsfklsajflsjfdlk that’s the german word for kittens?
katzenkinder?
literally: “cat children”
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ;w;

ISN’T GERMAN A CUTE LANGUAGEDO YOU KNOW THE GERMAN WORD FOR BATIT’S FLEDERMAUSFLUTTER-MOUSEHOW IS THAT NOT JUST KAWAII AS HECK

My favorite is their word for bagpipes.
DUDELSACK
doodle sack
seriously
But then their word for skull is Totenkopf, as in Death’s Head. 
So German basically has two settings, kawaii and metal, and there is no in between. 
I love German.

Reblogging for the German lesson.

mostlycatsmostly:

theparadoxmachine:

alanahikarichan:

hideousblob:

mostlycatsmostly:

Raising Kittens

(via Valerija S. Vlasov)

dsfklsajflsjfdlk that’s the german word for kittens?

katzenkinder?

literally: “cat children”

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ;w;

ISN’T GERMAN A CUTE LANGUAGE

DO YOU KNOW THE GERMAN WORD FOR BAT

IT’S FLEDERMAUS

FLUTTER-MOUSE

HOW IS THAT NOT JUST KAWAII AS HECK

My favorite is their word for bagpipes.

DUDELSACK

doodle sack

seriously

But then their word for skull is Totenkopf, as in Death’s Head. 

So German basically has two settings, kawaii and metal, and there is no in between. 

I love German.

Reblogging for the German lesson.

fightingforanimals:

Zoos Drive Animals Crazy; Fun for People, but Not for Animals

In the mid-1990s, Gus, a polar bear in the Central Park Zoo, alarmed visitors by compulsively swimming figure eights in his pool, sometimes for 12 hours a day. He stalked children from his underwater window, prompting zoo staff to put up barriers to keep the frightened children away from his predatory gaze. Gus’s neuroticism earned him the nickname “the bipolar bear,” a dose of Prozac, and $25,000 worth of behavioral therapy. 

Gus is one of the many mentally unstable animals featured in Laurel Braitman’s new book, Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves. The book features a dog that jumps out of a fourth floor apartment, a shin-biting miniature donkey, gorillas that sob, and compulsively masturbating walruses.* Much of the animal madness Braitman describes is caused by humans forcing animals to live in unnatural habitats, and the suffering that ensues is on display most starkly in zoos. “Zoos as institutions are deeply problematic,” Braitman told me. Gus, for example, was forced to live in an enclosure that is 0.00009 percent of the size his range would have been in his natural habitat. “It’s impossible to replicate even a slim fraction of the kind of life polar bears have in the wild,” Braitman writes.

Many animals cope with unstimulating or small environments through stereotypic behavior, which, in zoological parlance, is a repetitive behavior that serves no obvious purpose, such as pacing, bar biting, and Gus’ figure-eight swimming. Trichotillomania (repetitive hair plucking) and regurgitation and reingestation (the practice of repetitively vomiting and eating the vomit) are also common in captivity. According to Temple Grandin and Catherine Johnson, authors of Animals Make Us Human, these behaviors, “almost never occur in the wild.” In captivity, these behaviors are so common that they have a name: “zoochosis,” or psychosis caused by confinement.

The disruption of family or pack units for the sake of breeding is another stressor in zoos, especially in species that form close-knit groups, such as gorillas and elephants. Zoo breeding programs, which are overseen by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Animal Exchange Database, move animals around the country when they identify a genetically suitable mate. Tom, a gorilla featured in Animal Madness, was moved hundreds of miles away because he was a good genetic match for another zoo’s gorilla. At the new zoo, he was abused by the other gorillas and lost a third of his body weight. Eventually, he was sent back home, only to be sent to another zoo again once he was nursed back to health. When his zookeepers visited him at his new zoo, he ran toward them sobbing and crying, following them until visitors complained that the zookeepers were “hogging the gorilla.” While a strong argument can be made for the practice of moving animals for breeding purposes in the case of endangered species, animals are also moved because a zoo has too many of one species. The Milwaukee Zoo writes on its website that exchanging animals with other zoos “helps to keep their collection fresh and exciting.” 

Drugs are another common treatment for stereotypic behavior. “At every zoo where I spoke to someone, a psychopharmaceutical had been tried,” Braitman told me. She explained that pharmaceuticals are attractive to zoos because “they are a hell of a lot less expensive than re-doing your $2 million exhibit or getting rid of that problem creature.” But good luck getting some hard numbers on the practice. The AZA and the Smithsonian National Zoo declined to be interviewed for this article, and many zookeepers sign non-disclosure agreements. Braitman also found the industry hushed on this issue, likely because “finding out that the gorillas, badgers, giraffes, belugas, or wallabies on the other side of the glass are taking Valium, Prozac, or antipsychotics to deal with their lives as display animals is not exactly heartwarming news.” We do know, however, that the animal pharmaceutical industry is booming. In 2010, it did almost $6 billion in sales in the United States.

Source

misskitkatcupcake:

misskitkatcupcake:

Reblog if you are a SUPPORTIVE fitblr
No nasty anons, no name calling, no shaming, no nastiness, no ego, no drama, no stirring. Just an open inbox and any wisdom or support that I can share.

If anyone needs support or advice I’m always happy to help

misskitkatcupcake:

misskitkatcupcake:

Reblog if you are a SUPPORTIVE fitblr

No nasty anons, no name calling, no shaming, no nastiness, no ego, no drama, no stirring. Just an open inbox and any wisdom or support that I can share.

If anyone needs support or advice I’m always happy to help

turian-chocolate:

Hannibal Lecter + getting (affectionately) touchy requested by anonymous

21 July 2014 ♥ 2,337 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from fuckyeahannibal    source: turian-chocolate

shejla24:

these daddy blogs be thirsty for anything, you could post broccoli and someone will write a long ass paragraph like “this tight little piece of vegetable slut is obviously desperate for daddys hard thick cock pumping into all her holes”

21 July 2014 ♥ 22,872 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from vulcanprincessx    source: shejla24
cosplayingwhileblack:

X
Character: Raygo
Series: Kill La Kill

cosplayingwhileblack:

X

Character: Raygo

Series: Kill La Kill

macintush:

"It’s pronounced like jif"

Yeah well I don’t gif a fuck

20 July 2014 ♥ 289,808 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from crrocs
20 July 2014 ♥ 13,328 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from kissmyasajj    source: cockbarf

thatfunnyblog:

Game of Cats

20 July 2014 ♥ 213,219 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from thatfunnyblog    source: GQ